Title

Perceptions of CSR in Singapore

Publication Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

2007

Abstract

This paper reports the findings of a questionnaire survey that elicits the perceptions of Singapore adults of corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices in Singapore. The questionnaire design also endorses the relevance of a CSR framework, which combines research constructs derived from Carroll’s (1991) pyramid of corporate social responsibility—economic, legal, ethical, philanthropic—and Lawrence and Weber’s (2008, 48–49) principles of charity and stewardship. There is corroboration for a more CSR-oriented culture in Singapore judging from the consensus that being socially responsive can yield benefits such as better public image/reputation, increased brand image, increased community support, and improved employee morale. The survey also reveals some effects due to respondent demographics; for example, males rather than females place more emphasis on economic performance, and Christians rather than Buddhists and Taoists perceive more benefits such as increased brand image, increased customer loyalty, and better employee morale.

Discipline

Business Law, Public Responsibility, and Ethics | Human Resources Management

Research Areas

Strategy and Organisation

Publication

Journal of Asian Business

Volume

23

Issue

2

First Page

1

Last Page

14

ISSN

1068-0055