Publication Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

2007

Abstract

This article presents a longitudinal examination of antecedents and outcomes of work-to-family conflict. A total of 106 employees participating in an experience-sampling study were asked to respond to daily surveys both at work and at home, and their spouses were interviewed daily via telephone for a period of 2 weeks. Intraindividual analyses revealed that employees' perceptions of workload predicted work-to-family conflict over time, even when controlling for the number of hours spent at work. Workload also influenced affect at work, which in turn influenced affect at home. Finally, perhaps the most interesting finding in this study was that employees' behaviors in the family domain (reported by spouses) were predicted by the employees' perceptions of work-to-family conflict and their positive affect at home.

Keywords

work-family conflict, affect spillover, workload, job demands, affective states

Discipline

Business

Research Areas

Organisational Behaviour and Human Resources

Publication

Journal of Applied Psychology

Volume

92

Issue

5

First Page

1368

Last Page

1379

ISSN

0021-9010

Identifier

10.1037/0021-9010.92.5.1368

Publisher

American Psychological Association

City or Country

USA

Included in

Business Commons

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