Publication Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

2009

Abstract

The authors examine the differential influence of time changes associated with Daylight Saving Time on sleep quantity and associated workplace injuries. In Study 1, the authors used a National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health database of mining injuries for the years 1983–2006, and they found that in comparison with other days, on Mondays directly following the switch to Daylight Saving Time—in which 1 hr is lost—workers sustain more workplace injuries and injuries of greater severity. In Study 2, the authors used a Bureau of Labor Statistics database of time use for the years 2003–2006, and they found indirect evidence for the mediating role of sleep in the Daylight Saving Time–injuries relationship, showing that on Mondays directly following the switch to Daylight Saving Time, workers sleep on average 40 min less than on other days. On Mondays directly following the switch to Standard Time—in which 1 hr is gained—there are no significant differences in sleep, injury quantity, or injury severity.

Keywords

sleep, fatigue, safety in the workplace, work injuries, work scheduling, time changes, Daylight Saving Time

Discipline

Business

Research Areas

Organisational Behaviour and Human Resources

Publication

Journal of Applied Psychology

Volume

94

Issue

5

First Page

1305

Last Page

1317

ISSN

0021-9010

Identifier

10.1037/a0015320

Publisher

American Psychological Association

City or Country

USA

Included in

Business Commons

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