Publication Type

Report

Publication Date

6-2015

Abstract

Thai migrants first began trickling into the Chao Phraya river valley from Southern China in the eleventh century. Thai chieftains established petty kingdoms in modern-day Myanmar, Thailand and Laos, initially as tributaries to more established Burmese and Khmer rulers. However, both the diminishing influence of the Khmer Empire and the Mongols’ sacking of the Burmese capital Bagan in 1287 left a political vacuum in mainland Southeast Asia, which was soon filled by Thai kingdoms such as Sukhothai (1238–1463), Chiang Mai (1296–1775), Ayutthaya (1351–1767) and eventually Bangkok (f. 1 782). In the process, the up-and-coming Thai polities supplanted the Khmer Empire as the dominant power on the mainland, but they also largely absorbed cultural cues from the sophisticated Mon and Khmer peoples, including their writing systems, legal codes, art forms, political and administrative structures and the Theravada Buddhist religion.

Keywords

Thailand, History, Culture, Development

Discipline

Asian Studies | Growth and Development | History

Publication

Published

First Page

1

Last Page

17

Publisher

Institute for Societal Leadership

City or Country

Singapore

Embargo Period

1-25-2017

Copyright Owner and License

Singapore Management University

Additional URL

http://isl.smu.edu.sg/CIL

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